Core Network Evolution: Meeting the capacity challenge

Core Network Evolution: Meeting the capacity challenge

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The consumer trend towards living life online is evolving cloud computing where high-speed machine-to-machine data transfer is increasingly prevalent. To support this new world, core networks constantly face a capacity challenge. In little over two years, 100G systems have gone from commercialization to widespread deployment, but already some hotspots are nearing capacity exhaust. We will explore core network options for raising per-fiber capacity and meeting the future capacity demand challenge.

This free webinar brought to you by Telecoms.com in association with Corning Optical Fiber will cover the following key areas:

1. Understand the impact of utilization efficiency, packet and circuit switching, flexible grid, parallel optics, wideband WDM, the super-channel, and advanced modulation formats on meeting the capacity challenge

2. Explore the path to 400G and the super vs. single-channel debate

3. Learn from the perspective of an industry leader how new optical fiber innovation is providing solutions for this capacity challenge and the path to capacity-effective 400G and beyond

Tags; Archive, Cloud Computing, core networks, Corning Optical Fiber, Featured, M2M, network capacity, Optical fiber, telecoms.com
Q&A
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  • Merrion Edwards
    Merrion Edwards October 30, 2012 at 9:45 am

    Thank you all for attending this webinar and also for your very interesting questions in the Q&A session. I am signing out now but I will monitor the Q&A page regularly so you can still post any further questions that you have over the next couple of days and I will answer them as they come in. Note also that you or your colleagues can review the webinar again via the on-demand version on the Telecoms.com webinar archive webpage.

  • Thomas Saldanha October 30, 2012 at 9:05 am

    0.17dB/Km for SMF 28 ULL?

  • Thomas Saldanha October 30, 2012 at 9:02 am

    Thanks Merrion. It was very informative.

  • Josephine Ndambuki October 30, 2012 at 9:00 am

    thank you Merrion for a very enlightening session

  • rajen October 30, 2012 at 8:59 am

    Thanks Merrion for this very useful information.

  • Sangeeta Mohanty Bhargava October 30, 2012 at 8:54 am

    what is the typical attenuation in dB/Km for SMF 28 ULL?

  • Usman Aliyu October 30, 2012 at 8:54 am

    Could not watch the webinar but have enjoyed the Q&A. How do i get a recorded version?

    • Merrion Edwards
      Merrion Edwards October 30, 2012 at 9:09 am

      The webinar is available for further on-demand viewing on the Telecoms.com webinar archive page: it will be there for some time to enable you to review it at your leisure

  • Sangeeta Mohanty Bhargava October 30, 2012 at 8:52 am

    Thanks Merrion for the nice webinar.

  • neeraj.goyal October 30, 2012 at 8:51 am

    What should be max attenuation limits for a general optical fibre cable with ULL

    • Merrion Edwards
      Merrion Edwards October 30, 2012 at 9:04 am

      In any network it is the average cable attenuation over a given span or link that matters to the operator or system. The typical average cable attenuation of Corning SMF-28 ULL fibre is ≤0.17dB/km. Many cablers have already demonstrated equivalent performance in the installed cable.

  • armin October 30, 2012 at 8:47 am

    Hi Merrion, thank you, I really enjoyed your webinar.
    A good overview of the current situation.

  • Chayan Saha October 30, 2012 at 8:47 am

    What is the connector type proposed to be used with LEAF fibers for long distance and access network for reducing the span loss further

    • Merrion Edwards
      Merrion Edwards October 30, 2012 at 9:07 am

      Any angle-polished connector with a low loss specification should support the low span loss required.

  • Thomas Saldanha October 30, 2012 at 8:46 am

    Very informative…thanks.

  • nripenpaul October 30, 2012 at 8:43 am

    Hi Mam
    In a reply, you have suggested for overhead deployment. But fibre cut rate in that is maximum. Can you suggest any special quality immune to cut and slagging.
    Thanks.

    • Merrion Edwards
      Merrion Edwards October 30, 2012 at 9:15 am

      What I have observed in certain countries where there is an issue with theft and cut of overhead cables, is that operators have started to use a completely different colour (e.g orange not black) for all optical fiber cables so it is clear that these cables do not contain high value copper, and theft and associated cuts can be reduced as a result.

  • matthewguinan October 30, 2012 at 8:40 am

    Hi Merrion, thank you, I really enjoyed your webinar.
    Do you know if there have there been any case studies featuring LEAF fiber on 100G direct detection systems?
    Thanks

    • Merrion Edwards
      Merrion Edwards October 30, 2012 at 8:44 am

      The low cost energy-efficient direct-detection (non-coherent) 100G systems have only recently been released by ADVA. You are best contacting ADVA directly for information on live deployments and case studies.

  • Tariq October 30, 2012 at 8:39 am

    Hi, we have deployed Optical Fiber network in Pakistan for universities/Institutes/colleges, we have G-652.d fiber in Metro and G-655 in Long haul.
    we are using G.652-d for up to 80Km for 1GbE and 10 GbE, is it technically ok?

    • Merrion Edwards
      Merrion Edwards October 30, 2012 at 8:56 am

      Yes, G.652.D is fully capable of supporting 1GbE and 10GbE to 80km. G.655 fiber may be cable of achieving additional reach due to ts lower dispersion.

  • Narendra Jain October 30, 2012 at 8:37 am

    NICE TO SEE…..THANKS A LOT

  • Sangeeta Mohanty Bhargava October 30, 2012 at 8:33 am

    What eaxctly in the Corning SMF 28 ULL has which makes it work for 64 links?

    • Merrion Edwards
      Merrion Edwards October 30, 2012 at 8:48 am

      At 400G, reach is severely limited due to the stringent OSNR requirements. Many links that are practically desirable cannot be achieved using standard single-mode fiber without regeneration (as the case-study in Germany demonstrated). Corning SMF-28 ULL has the lowest attenuation of any terrestrial optical fiber. This provides an OSNR advantage to the network, making it possible to span many links that would otherwise only be possible with expensive regeneration. It is the low attenuation of SMF-28 ULL that enables this extension of unregenerated reach and allows 64% of links (based on the Germany case study) to be spanned.

  • Sangeeta Mohanty Bhargava October 30, 2012 at 8:31 am

    What exactly does regeneration mean?

    • Merrion Edwards
      Merrion Edwards October 30, 2012 at 8:41 am

      Regeneration is where the optical signal is transformed by a receiver back into an electrical signal so that the signal can be reshaped and retimed before being converted back into an optical signal again by a transmitter and retransmitted on the fibre. Regeneration requires optical transmitters and receivers and so is very expensive relative to optical amplification and it is for this reason that the industry strives to reduce the need for regeneration by increasing the all optical transmission distance/reach between regenerators.

  • vgranullaque October 30, 2012 at 8:13 am

    Hi Merrion, thank you for a very interesting webinar. When would you say it is the right time to start deploying low loss fibre?

    • Merrion Edwards
      Merrion Edwards October 30, 2012 at 8:38 am

      The sooner you start deploying low attenuation fibers even just in small upgrade or repair sections of the network the earlier that you start to lower the average attenuation of your network and benefit from the cost and performance advantages afforded by a network with a low fiber attenuation.

      • vgranullaque October 30, 2012 at 8:55 am

        Ok thanks. And how likely do you think it is that we need to use large effective area fibers in terrestrial networks?

        • Merrion Edwards
          Merrion Edwards October 30, 2012 at 9:11 am

          It is clear that large effective area in conjunction with ultra-low loss is the best fiber enabler to 400G and beyond. But there is backwards compatibility to the G.652 fiber standard to consider. However, if an operator is building a new greenfield express link that needs to carry very high capacity, it is possible that they may consider using fiber with both large effective area and ultra-low attenuation like Vascade® EX2000 and Vascade® EX3000 fibers in a terrestrial scenario. Where G.652 backwards compatibility is required, it is clear that G.652 compliant ultra-low loss fiber like Corning® SMF-28® ULL is the best option.

  • Harendra Vishwakarma October 30, 2012 at 8:12 am

    not able to see this… can any one help????

  • Jim Dev October 30, 2012 at 8:08 am

    Also, what is the price premium for ultra-low loss fibers relative to standard fibers?

    • Merrion Edwards
      Merrion Edwards October 30, 2012 at 8:54 am

      Fiber typically represents a small fraction (single digit %) of the overall network cost and yet is the foundation of the whole network and thus can determine the cost of the rest of the components. So choosing the right fiber for the right applications is critical. Yes, ultra low loss fibers come at a premium relative to standard fibers but given that the cost of the fiber in the network is small while the cost-saving impact of ultra-low loss fibers is large, as a result the fiber premium is immediately and usually overwhelmingly offset by the savings it enables in terms of CapEx (amplifiers and regenerators) and OpEx (lower energy and maintenance costs) leaving the operator with significant net gains in terms of CapEx and lifetime OpEx.

  • Jim Dev October 30, 2012 at 8:07 am

    How can Low Loss fiber help in an existing network compared to a Greenfield build?

    • Merrion Edwards
      Merrion Edwards October 30, 2012 at 8:48 am

      In an existing network every time you have to do a repair, patch or re-route if you use low loss fiber instead of an equivalent legacy fiber you will begin, from the first day you start to use low loss fiber, to bring down the average attenuation of your network. In time, the attenuation of your network will decrease close to the low levels that are now available on current advanced low attenation fibers. The sooner you start the sooner you get a low loss network.

  • Usman Aliyu October 30, 2012 at 7:18 am

    With the growing demand for capacity, difficulty in laying fiber due to terrain and right of way issues, and increasing scarcity of microwave resources for last mile BTS connectivity, what are the options for a regulator

    • Merrion Edwards
      Merrion Edwards October 30, 2012 at 8:38 am

      To address the capacity issue, optical fiber cable needs to be deployed. The regulator should concentrate on opening-up new rights of way for cable laying. Where terrain is difficult for cable laying, overhead deployment should be encouraged. Use of low-loss fiber can allow difficult and remote terrain to be spanned without need for amplifiers.

  • Merrion Edwards
    Merrion Edwards October 30, 2012 at 9:25 am

    Corning SMF-28 ULL is a G.652 fiber and so it’s specifications are totally compatible with any existing links of G.652 fiber so you will have no issue if you use Corning SMF-28 ULL within your existing links: it splices and connects just like any G.652 fiber. Does this answer your question or do you have any other specific concerns?